MUDKISS FANZINE

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THE TAPESTY/ SCUTTERS/ NEW STREET ADVENTURE @ THE SOUP KITCHEN, MANCHESTER 02/08/13 – REVIEW BY PHILIP HOWE

Following on from successful support slots for Pete Doherty, The View and The Courteeners, The Tapestry take their own brand of guitar fuelled indie pop to the Soup Kitchen in Manchester's Northern Quarter.  Upstairs you can sample a daily changing menu a la canteen style, and then head downstairs to the dungeon to sample an extra large earful of musical afters.
 

Two bands provide support tonight, Scuttlers and New Street Adventure. Scuttlers are a four piece who create good indie music, as shown in finale 'Off The Cuff', a song that is not simply verse, chorus, verse, but intricate guitars and a great Mersey beat backing. New Street Adventures, fresh from recording their first album for legendary Acid Jazz records are a roots and all soul manoeuvre with a confidence that forces you to like them.  Themes of Motown and Womack ensure that every song is familiar and you really need to hear them.

The Tapestry have sold out the 200 capacity venue for a well earned night of self proclaimed 'Dirty Garage Pop' and get straight to it with opener 'Tear Up'. This is a no nonsense opener and sets the tone for the nine songs to follow.  The Tapestry are a well organised group of four with an uncommon 50/50 male/female split. Zara's drumming leads from the back, Katy's bass driving the more dance orientated numbers, as well as providing support for the more intricate guitar melodies provided by Dyna and confident frontman Liam. They have a certain stage presence that is no set of mannequin dummies as well.  Its clear all members are really into there own songs, standing still only when providing backing vocals into a stationary mic stand.  In fact the only one without a mic is Zara, who sings along with every line, only to drown herself out with an equally emphatic drum performance.  The backing vocals are harmonious, the rhythm section tight and the guitars catchy.

Every song is a crowd pleasing anthem that the assembled public are only too willing to pogo around to, breaking out in an incident of crowd surfing when necessary and belting out every song word for word. 'My Phoney War' is a very Pixies sounding disaster song with tales of tyranny and flag waving evacuations, not lyrics usually found in singalong crowd pleasers.  They even named a song after themselves which is a strange move, but works well.  "If you've got to dance to one song tonight, this has got to be it" declared Liam, before launching into 'The Tapestry', and dance they did to the pounding terrace chanting anthem. There isn't a single let down song in their set, nor is there a drawn out self indulgent ballad, yet, no two songs are the same.  'We talk' follows with a wailing guitar riff over another dance driven rhythm track, which can easily be heard on the more than adequate sound system in this small venue. The biggest cloud pleaser has been left to the end, as debut single 'Rode Your Luck' rings out, keeping the crowd on 'tenterhooks' and bouncing around one last time.

This was a rousing performance from a young band with a stage presence that surpasses their years.  This band has a real chemistry and committed to delivering their brand of guitar filled music to an assembled crowd.  This is a band that not only you should go and see, but a band you should see again. No mention of an album yet and that may be a good thing, as bands often seek to release an album before the songwriting has even finished and the melodies perfected, with the advent of iTunes and social media, but have released two singles already.  This is a packed out gig in a small venue not to be forgotten.  Is it me, or did I just witness something?

Set list:

Tear Up
Replace Myself
Take Turns
My Phoney War
The Boy Will Not Return
The Tapestry
We Talk
No Mistake (chilled!)
Right as Rain
Rode Your Luck

Review & photos by Philip Howe