MUDKISS FANZINE

Mudkiss is now an archived site, there will be no more updates. Mudkiss operated from 2008 till 2013.

IAN HUNTER AND THE RANT BAND / OTIS GIBBS @KOMEDIA BATH 23/10/12 - REVIEW BY ANDY BARNES

 
While perhaps not exhibiting the same historical significance as the spa city of Bath itself, Ian Hunter has a musical heritage envied by most. One of Britain’s finest, most consistent song writers, lead singer with the superlative Mott The Hoople in the early 70's, worked with luminaries including David Bowie, Mick Ronson, Mick Jones and Todd Rundgren to name a miniscule few, his C.V up there with the absolute cream of the industry.  And now, at the age of 73, retirement still obviously not an option, new and critically acclaimed album “When I’m President” released early September, before undertaking an October tour of Sweden, Scotland and England prior dates back in the U.S and Canada during November and December. The recording and performing light far from dimming, no energy saving alternatives required just yet.

Before Hunter with his Rant Band, take the stage, Indiana’s Otis Gibbs entertains a generous crowd within the elegant confines of Komedia, an old grade two listed cinema converted to a live venue back in 2008. Gibbs, an acoustic country, blues singer songwriter, with deeply rich, husky vocals, the type traditionally developed through imbibition of numerous cigarettes and shots of whisky. Between melancholic, deeply touching songs, he highlights a penchant for witty stories, endearing the audience even more wholeheartedly to this salt of the earth American. The only disappointment, even after a resounding reception and shouts of “more” no time for encores to take place, instead graciously making way for the main act. 

Hunter and The Rant Band saunter out, little in the way of fanfare, quickly assembling and breaking immediately into a new track “Comfortable (Flying Scotsman)” from the latest album. Having never seen Hunter before, I'm slightly surprised at the lack of crowd interaction throughout, only really taking time to introduce the title track from “When I’m President.” The temperature within the venue admittedly, not conducive with a septuagenarian 90 minute performance and I’m sure all assembled would strive to keep rockin until a similar age, whilst maintaining, perhaps even more impressively, a full head of hair, although for many, (including me) that, already a step too far.

On occasion Hunter appears slightly frail and tired, perhaps leading to “Moon Upstairs” being omitted from the encores, although nothing detracts in any way from an excellent and energetic performance tonight. The Rant Band exemplary, all relishing an appreciative crowd, who although initially reserved, rouse completely once the brief strains of “Irene Wild” subside into the instantly recognisable piano intro of “All the Way From Memphis.” 

Uz1ELUVYVKM

The set is perfectly structured, a mixture of timeless Mott plus solo compositions with a generous sprinkling of new songs and although a privilege to hear the classics, my highlight of the evening, the wonderfully atmospheric “Crazy Horse” guitarists Mark Bosch and James Mastro supplementing Hunter’s simplistic chord structure and ethnic American rhythms with understated, restrained brilliance, coaxing ethereal sounds from both their instruments.

F5ncGNmah7Q

The question could be asked, why Hunter would put himself through the whole touring process at this later stage of life.........ultimately, once a performer, always a performer and based on tonight, while all may be, more mature, rather than young dudes, Ian Hunter and his Rant Band still have much to offer.........long may they continue.  

Set List:        

Comfortable (Flying Scotsman)
Once Bitten Twice Shy
Fatally Flawed
Wash us Away
Just the Way You Look Tonight
23A
Memphis
All American Alien Boy
Black Tears
Just Another Night
It Ain't Easy
When I’m President
Flowers
Roll Away the Stone
Mother of Picasso
Sweet Jane
Crazy horse
Saturday Gigs, Life, All the Young Dudes.

http://ianhunter.com

Review by Andy Barnes
Photos by Robin Linton